A drug that activates only your father’s version of a gene may treat neural disorder

Anyone who’s passed basic biology knows that we get one copy of a gene from our mother, a second from our father. But few people realize that not all of these genes end up being treated equally. Imprinted genes are expressed from only the maternal or paternal allele, rather than both. And, when this process goes wrong, it can actually lead to diseases. Now, researchers have identified a possible way to treat imprinting errors.

In the brain, Ube3a is an imprinted gene; only the maternal allele is expressed, even if it is mutated and the paternal allele is normal. This is the case in Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutation or deletion of the maternal allele of Ube3a. Ube3a is imprinted only in the brain, though; in other tissues, the paternal allele is expressed along with the maternal one.

This led Benjamin Philpot and his colleagues at UNC Chapel Hill to wonder: wouldn’t it be great if we could get the normal, paternal version of Ube3a to work in the brain—to unsilence it? Maybe this could help kids with Angelman syndrome.A drug that activates only your father's version of a gene may treat neural disorder

via A drug that activates only your father’s version of a gene may treat neural disorder.

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