First-Ever Recording of Blood Vessel Development During the Formation of an Organ

 

A new microscope system that can take 3-D pictures of an embryonic mouse organ over 24 to 48 hours has shown Duke Medical Center researchers the first glimpse of the formation of blood vessels during development.

Among other things, a team lead by cell biologist Blanche Capel, Ph.D., has found a previously unknown mechanism in the formation of blood vessels that may help scientists better understand how a tumor rallies a blood supply to its aid. Continue reading “First-Ever Recording of Blood Vessel Development During the Formation of an Organ”

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Major “Missed” Biochemical Pathway Emerges As Important in Virtually All Cells

A new study by Duke University researchers provides more evidence that the nitric oxide (NO) system in the life of a cell plays a key role in disease, and the findings point to ways to improve treatment of illnesses such as heart disease and cancer.

The nitric oxide system in cells is “a major biological signaling pathway that has been missed with regard to the way it controls proteins,” and it is linked to cancer and other diseases when the system goes awry, said Jonathan Stamler, M.D., a professor of medicine and biochemistry at Duke University Medical Center who worked on the study. Continue reading “Major “Missed” Biochemical Pathway Emerges As Important in Virtually All Cells”

Regulatory B Cells Do Exist – and could prevent allergies

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have uncovered definitive evidence that a small but potent subset of immune system B cells is able to regulate inflammation.

Using a new set of scientific tools to identify and count these cells, the team showed that these B cells can block contact hypersensitivity, the type of skin reactions that many people have when they brush against poison ivy. Continue reading “Regulatory B Cells Do Exist – and could prevent allergies”